GO GREEN WITH YOUR CLOSET.

Every morning, looking at our giant closet the first thing that comes to our mind is “I DON’T HAVE ANYTHING TO WEAR, I NEED TO SHOP”.

Then magically we take our new Zara dress, slip into our Jimmy Choo and we are off to shop.

But what we don’t realize is that subconsciously we are contributing for carbon footprints which lead to global warming. According to a recent survey, to convert raw materials into finished products, textiles use at least 8000 toxic chemicals. This human impact has devastated life on our planet, leaving a very large footprint – and that’s just the creation process. Based on the life span of any given product, the remaining half of the ecological footprint occurs after the garment is purchased.

Global awareness of our carbon footprint is steadily on the rise. The world population is developing a fundamental understanding of the need for ecologically sound practices. Choices for sustainable, eco clothes keep that momentum rolling.

So what changes can we do?

Going green with your closet is a simple way to protect our environment. By making small changes in our shopping techniques we can make big a difference.

Before buying a cloth make sure to check the material. Bamboo, silk, organic cotton, soy, hemp are one of the few natural, eco-friendly fabrics on the market. Before you shop, it’s best to know the ins and outs of each.

When we purchase merchandise from a brand, we are not just buying a piece of clothing or a statement necklace. We are also indirectly giving our seal of approval on its labor and environmental practices. We need to know more about the brands we tend to wear. Visit their websites and check the label before supporting them.

Wash with care. Buy green laundry detergent. It does the same job without the harsh, synthetic chemicals that harm the environment and pose health hazards. To save energy, wash on low heat and line dry.
If you need to dry clean your clothes, search for an eco-friendly, organic cleaner in your neighborhood that doesn’t use perchloroethylene (perc), a common chemical used by many traditional dry cleaners. It’s been listed as a hazardous air pollutant by the Clean Air Act and a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the US Environmental Protection Agency.

These minor changes in our daily life might be noticeable to us but they would show their effect in long term.

A small contribution towards the growing problem of global warming, by International Centre of Culture and Education (ICCE) is Green(R)evolution. Join our initiative to protect the environment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *